About Kevin

Kevin Sprouls, Creator of the Wall Street Journal stipple hedcut portrait style. Sprouls introduced the hallmark portrait style to the Wall Street Journal in 1979. Between 1979 and 1987, Kevin worked on staff for the paper, creating illustrations and training artists in the style. He currently is the main illustrator for Worth magazine. His pen is housed in the Newseum in Washington, D.C.

Architecture, New Yorker Art, Lettering, Mr. Balvenie Illustrations

all images, c. Kevin Sprouls This time, a gallery of my work covering Architecture, New Yorker Art, Lettering and Mr. Balvenie Illustrations. It is a varied group of images, and all are new to this blog. So, I hope you’ll … Continue reading

An interview with WSJ

I recently did an interview with the WSJ Digital Media team. They were eager to learn how I developed the iconic Wall Street Journal Hedcut style. I’m including a few illustrations I created while on staff at The Journal: This … Continue reading

Classic WSJ Hedcut Illustrations

all images, c. Kevin Sprouls As I rifled through my tattered portfolio case today, looking for an envelope that would make it to Saudi Arabia, I came upon a suitable candidate. It had a cache of Classic WSJ Hedcut Illustrations … Continue reading

WSJ Illustrations and June Weddings

all images, c. Kevin Sprouls June is a classic month for weddings and I’m celebrating with a couple of WSJ illustrations. The inspiration for this post was a wedding I attended recently. It was truly ‘over the top’! So, I’ve … Continue reading

Portrait of a Family

all illustrations, c. Kevin Sprouls I recently took on a very challenging assignment. A high school pal of mine contacted me about creating a piece of art for him. He told me he wanted an illustration of his family that … Continue reading

Portraits for the Statue of Liberty Museum

all images, c. Kevin Sprouls Last week, the new Statue of Liberty Museum opened in New York. I was commissioned to create three oversized portraits in the WSJ hedcut style that I pioneered. The drawings were produced to be made … Continue reading